thesleepywest:

This looks so cool. But the ex- firefighter side of me says this is a bad, bad idea.

This thing was so overwhelmingly massive to see in person. Just bewildering how they manage to not burn whole neighborhoods down.

perksoaw:

Bonfires across Belfast 2014

perksoaw:

Bonfires across Belfast 2014

jaytwatsby:

So this was apparently Belfast last night.

jaytwatsby:

So this was apparently Belfast last night.

Totally off-topic (whatever that is, at the moment) of this blog… But: Five years ago today I rescued my BFF, Olive, from one of LA’s many high-kill shelters. 

She was 8 months old at the time, and had been returned to the pound by her previous adoptive family because “they didn’t have time for her” and “she chewed things.” (You got a puppy, what the did you expect?) Anyway, their stupid decision was my huge gain. She is the amazing, incredible, hilarious, loving, too-smart-for-her-own-good light of my life. A decade of struggling with terrible insomnia was put to an end the first night I brought her home: she crawled under the covers, put her head on my chest and all my anxiety just melted away. This is how we’ve both slept soundly in the five years ever since.

The reason I wanted to share this today (on her adoption-day-anniversary) is because Olive’s happily-ever-after is NOT THE TYPICAL FATE OF SHELTER ANIMALS. If you abandon (or “return”) a pet to the shelter, it will most likely be KILLED within a few days. Good or bad behavior, cute or battle-scarred, doesn’t matter. Shelters might be run by good people, but there are just too many animals and not nearly enough room or resources. As a rule, abandoned animals are traumatized and then they die. End of.

IF YOU CAN’T TAKE CARE OF A PET FOR THE ENTIRETY OF ITS LIFE, DO NOT GET ONE. If something unexpected happens (your financial situation changes, you become too ill, etc.) and you absolutely can no longer keep your pet, then seek out no-kill rescue organizations or find a new home for them yourself. Wherever you live, search hard and ye shall find options. Exploit them.

And NO excuses about “moving” and non-pet-friendly rentals. Pets are very portable. Much more so than the IKEA sofa and boxes of crap you’ll happily pay to ship across the continent. And, yeah, finding a place that takes pets can be HARD. The last time I moved, after seemingly endless searching, there was only ONE apartment available in all of LA that (a) I could afford, (b) allowed pets, and (c) wasn’t a total shit hole. It’s far from work, far from friends, tiny and dark. But it’s fine for now. Rentals are temporary. Better options will come along. Anything (and I mean ANYTHING) is do-able, as long as I have my family - which includes Olive.

Sorry for the rant. But, please, love your pets and keep them close or don’t get one at all. If you do decide to get a pet, save the life of one at a shelter. They have all species and breeds and even puppies and kittens if ‘raising one from a baby’ is important to you. Please and thanks. 

And happy Adoption Day, Olive!

Totally off-topic (whatever that is, at the moment) of this blog… But: Five years ago today I rescued my BFF, Olive, from one of LA’s many high-kill shelters.

She was 8 months old at the time, and had been returned to the pound by her previous adoptive family because “they didn’t have time for her” and “she chewed things.” (You got a puppy, what the did you expect?) Anyway, their stupid decision was my huge gain. She is the amazing, incredible, hilarious, loving, too-smart-for-her-own-good light of my life. A decade of struggling with terrible insomnia was put to an end the first night I brought her home: she crawled under the covers, put her head on my chest and all my anxiety just melted away. This is how we’ve both slept soundly in the five years ever since.

The reason I wanted to share this today (on her adoption-day-anniversary) is because Olive’s happily-ever-after is NOT THE TYPICAL FATE OF SHELTER ANIMALS. If you abandon (or “return”) a pet to the shelter, it will most likely be KILLED within a few days. Good or bad behavior, cute or battle-scarred, doesn’t matter. Shelters might be run by good people, but there are just too many animals and not nearly enough room or resources. As a rule, abandoned animals are traumatized and then they die. End of.

IF YOU CAN’T TAKE CARE OF A PET FOR THE ENTIRETY OF ITS LIFE, DO NOT GET ONE. If something unexpected happens (your financial situation changes, you become too ill, etc.) and you absolutely can no longer keep your pet, then seek out no-kill rescue organizations or find a new home for them yourself. Wherever you live, search hard and ye shall find options. Exploit them.

And NO excuses about “moving” and non-pet-friendly rentals. Pets are very portable. Much more so than the IKEA sofa and boxes of crap you’ll happily pay to ship across the continent. And, yeah, finding a place that takes pets can be HARD. The last time I moved, after seemingly endless searching, there was only ONE apartment available in all of LA that (a) I could afford, (b) allowed pets, and (c) wasn’t a total shit hole. It’s far from work, far from friends, tiny and dark. But it’s fine for now. Rentals are temporary. Better options will come along. Anything (and I mean ANYTHING) is do-able, as long as I have my family - which includes Olive.

Sorry for the rant. But, please, love your pets and keep them close or don’t get one at all. If you do decide to get a pet, save the life of one at a shelter. They have all species and breeds and even puppies and kittens if ‘raising one from a baby’ is important to you. Please and thanks.

And happy Adoption Day, Olive!

The New York Times Death by Design: Your Clothes Cost More Than You Think

This is video is important for so many very clear reasons.

One more subtle reason I would like to point out is that there is an image in here - part of the collection of this gentleman’s coverage on the Bangladesh garment factory collapse - showing a man and woman buried in the rubble. I have seen this same image circulating tumblr multiple times. Those other posts claim the image to be from the aftermath of the Philippines typhoon, and include romantic stories that are, presumably, the work of pure fiction. 

Both disastrous events were heart breaking and beyond terrible. But please use this as a caution about stories on tumblr (or anywhere else) that don’t provide direct links back to their verifiable source. These were real people, with real and meaningful lives who suffered the most horrific of deaths. Their stories need to be shared, but with as much dignity and respect as the tumblr community can muster up.

thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math


Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!

thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!

(via cinnabana)

fotojournalismus:

In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus

Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.

An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.

Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.

Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.

Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 

She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.

somestrikers:

AN OPEN LETTER TO UC GRAD STUDENTS—

This coming week, our union—United Auto Workers Local 2865—has called a system-wide strike in protest of unfair labor practices (ULPs) by the university. Although particular grievances differ from campus to campus, in aggregate, they concern the university’s…

In my own experience, UCLA TA’s do more active teaching than most professors. I owe almost all of my academic growth to their hard work and guidance. I’m reporting this in solidarity.

buttacious:

20th Anniversary of the Rawandan Genocide Spring of 1994…..

(via cinnabana)

rockscanfly:

sixpenceee:

Before I get into it, just know the pictures just serve as visual representations, not actual pictures

Okay so anyway, evidence for this theory is the following:

THE FACT THAT HUMANS ARE SO HAIRLESS: 

Only two kind of habitats give rise to hairless animals, an aquatic one and a one below the ground (a naked mole rat for example)

.The suggestion that humans have become hairless to prevent overheating has been rendered false because hair can act like a defense against the sun.

This is why camels retain their fur even in the hot dessert environment. 

OUR FAT CELLS

We have ten times the number of fat cells as expected in an animal our size. Only two types of animals have large fat cells: hibernating and aquatic ones. 

In hibernating it’s seasonal fat, but in aquatic it’s all year round. It’s unreasonable to think that we evolved this feature in land because large fat pockets would have just slowed us down. 

Primate babies are always born slender, but human babies start to develop fat even before birth. 

WALKING ON TWO LEGS

So we’re the only mammals that have developed bipedalism. This is a surprise, because walking on 2 legs vs. walking on 4 legs is very disadvantageous. It’s slower, unstable, our organs are vulnerable to damage.

One theory is that if our habitat was flooded, we’d have to walk on two legs to keep our heads above the water.

The only animal who has ever evolved a pelvis like ours, the swamp ape, used this method. 

BREATHING

We have conscious control over our breathing. Ever other land animal doesn’t. Mammals like dolphins and seals also conscious control because it tells them how deep they are going to dive and they can estimate how much air they need to inhale.

OTHER DIFFERENCES

Our body is so wasteful of salt and water. Think of tears and our way of sweating. Other land mammals don’t have this. Water mammals do however. 

Okay anyway I hope you learned something. 

Here’s a source and where you can find more information: X

For more interesting posts like this, go here: X

Okay, this is interesting- but no.

Second of all, there’s no where near enough factual support to call this a theory. Hypothesis? Sure. But it’s not well supported enough to be a theory yet, and here’s why:

Anthropologists have tried to explain a multitude of unique features of modern humans as the result of a single adaptive breakthrough- these kinds of hypotheses are called “umbrella hypotheses” and are appealing for their intuitive simplicity but are often internal inconsistent and not backed up by the fossil record or molecular research into genetics.

The Aquatic Ape Hypothesis isn’t parsimonious in the least- and that kinda an important thing for evolutionary hypotheses that rely almost entirely on the fossil record for their back-up. (Note: in this context, parsimony refers to the adoption of the simplest assumption in the formulation of a theory or in the interpretation of data).

A lot of the evidence given above isn’t really evidence at all. It’s based on the assumption that aquatic and amphibious life back in the age when we would have supposedly been partially aquatic was the same as it is in the modern era. It’s based on the idea that we would gained all those adaptions in an evolutionary short period of time, and would have retained them when they became not only unnecessary but also potentially harmful. If we try to say bipedalism was just an adaption to aquatic life, and that our evidence for this is that bipedalism is actually an impediment on land, how do we explain the fact that bipedalism wasn’t selected against once humans returned to terrestrial life?

And how do you back up this supposed “theory” when there’s little to no evidence of it in the fossil record, and no current evidence of it in molecular DNA research? Where. Is. Your. Evidence.

You can’t just draw a bunch of likely seeming inferences off of current life to form theories about how things went millions of years ago. So much random bullshit has been proven to have happened in the course of natural history that it’s kinda dumb to just think that because one explanation makes some intuitive sense that it’s actually what happened.

And the simple fact is that aquatic theory isn’t as parsimonious as terrestrial theory. The numerous “explanations” for individual anatomical traits that it proposes constitute premises that are not better founded than competing terrestrial “explanations”. The unifying theme of aquatic adaptation is considerably less parsimonious than the assumption that the human lineage has always been terrestrial.

Look, I’m not just ripping on aquatic theory here. Any single-cause theory that tries to explain as many of our adaptions at it does is liable to be wrong. The mosaic pattern of hominid evolution demonstrated by the fossil record just doesn’t support those kind of theories, and so far DNA and other kinds of molecular research doesn’t either.

Umbrella hypotheses like this one are popular because they seem like simple answers; Simple answers, however wrong, are easier to communicate and more readily accepted than more sound but more complex solutions. Evolutionary science, and science in general, has to deal with this kind of problem all the time.

Try to remember that something science-y that sounds cool and seems to make some initial sense is actually more likely to be wrong than right. There is a reason it takes so much time and effort from so many generations of people to get breakthroughs. Science is complicated shit.

(Major Info sources: Wikipedia, this article from a 1997 journal on human evolution)

(Source: sixpenceee, via pyrrhiccomedy)

(Source: ohmyfreud, via pyrrhiccomedy)

brannerdoodles:

choclit98:

paulamaf2013:

gladiatorinalabcoat:

(I work the floor at an independently-owned menswear store. The owner, my boss, spends a lot of time at the shop, and tries to keep prices as low as possible to help our city’s large homeless population get good…

(Source: geminidragonbadger)

"By the way, it’s great that we’re finally getting to see a woman make these kinds of tough choices, when on TWD they’ve usually gone to Rick, Shane or even “Brian.” TV is filled with antiheroes but we don’t often see too many antiheroines making controversial game-changing story decisions. Usually women just end up reacting to calls made by men. In that sense, brava on all fronts."

The Walking Dead Season 4 Episode 14 Recap: Lizzie Loses Her Mind, Carol Loses Everything in “The Grove” (via roywalkering)

(Source: quodl, via roywalkering)

"The more closely the author thinks of why he wrote, the more he comes to regard his imagination as a kind of self-generating cement which glued his facts together, and his emotions as a kind of dark and obscure designer of those facts. Reluctantly, he comes to the conclusion that to account for his book is to account for his life."

— Richard Wright (via writingquotes)

thealy50:

The village of Dooagh, Achill Island, County Mayo, Ireland. 1860 - 70’s. From the National Library of Ireland collection, Ireland 1860 - 80 from Stereo Photographs.Not so green.

Dooagh! My home, sweet home.

thealy50:

The village of Dooagh, Achill Island, County Mayo, Ireland. 1860 - 70’s. From the National Library of Ireland collection, Ireland 1860 - 80 from Stereo Photographs.Not so green.

Dooagh! My home, sweet home.